Skip to content

April A-Z Challenge – K for Bridget Berlinda Kennedy

The Blogging from A to Z April Challenge is a challenge put out to bloggers to publish a post from A-Z every day in April, except for Sundays. April 1 is A, and so on throughout the month. Bloggers can post randomly or on a theme. The theme I have chosen is ‘My Ancestors’. I used this same theme for the Blogging from A-Z April Challenge in 2015. This time the ancestors posted about will mostly be more distant members of the family. Hopefully, when combined this will form a full picture of my family history.

BRIDGET BERLINDA KENNEDY, my great great great grandmother, was born in 1817 in Ireland.  On 3 February 1836, Bridget married James Lowe in Hobart, Tasmania. There is evidence that Bridget went by the name of Berlinda. This unusual spelling was repeated in our family.

Just a few months before the marriage, Bridget was to sue James for breach of promise.

The following report is from The Tasmanian, October 23, 1835, page 5

image

KENNEDY v. LOWE. This was an action brought for a breach of promise of marriage by the plaintiff, Belinda Kennedy, against James Lowe, the defendant in this action. Mr.. Attorney General appeared for the plaintiff, who stated that the defendant had a short time since, he believed, gone to Sydney, although he had previously been served with notice of this action, and he had suffered judgment to go by default. After explaining the nature of the case, he called— William Marks, who deposed, that he knew Belinda Kennedy the plaintiff, and James Lowe, the defendant. Plaintiff was in the service of Mr. H. Bilton as housemaid. Witness was also in Mr. Bilton’s service. Defendant had been paying his addresses to plaintiff for twelve months before she left Mr. Bilton’s, which is about two months ago. He appeared to be very, fond of her until within the last three months, when he did not appear to be so attentive. The last time witness had any conversation with defendant, he (witness) told him that as he had got the girl into trouble, he ought to get her out of it. Defendant made light of it, and said it was not the same here as in England, and they could not make him pay for the child. He said his father was going to set him up in business, and he would marry the girl in September, but he (witness) was not to tell her so, but to keep the secret. Defendant is twenty one, and the girl is 18. Thinks defendant is gone to Sydney. Mr. Henry Bilton.—Knew of the courtship; defendant’s visits were not clandestine; plaintiff had been in his service eighteen months. She left about eighteen months ago in consequence of her own wish. She was a very respectable girl and the best servant he ever had for honesty, industry and sobriety. Defendant lived with his father as a clerk.  Verdict for the plaintiff. Damages £200

James and Bridget married in Hobart, just four months after the court action and went on to have eight children. The first born, Ellen Virginia was my great great grandmother who married JOSEPH HENRY JONES.

Bridget died on 22 May 1851 and is buried in St. Mary’s churchyard, Hobart.

 

 

April A-Z Challenge – J for ‘Bossy Jones’

The Blogging from A to Z April Challenge is a challenge put out to bloggers to publish a post from A-Z every day in April, except for Sundays. April 1 is A, and so on throughout the month. Bloggers can post randomly or on a theme. The theme I have chosen is ‘My Ancestors’. I used this same theme for the Blogging from A-Z April Challenge in 2015. This time the ancestors posted about will mostly be more distant members of the family. Hopefully, when combined this will form a full picture of my family history.

I have decided that the letter ‘J’ will be a reblog, mainly because I think this ancestory is an interesting story that deserves to be told again.

GODFREY EDWARD JONES, known as Bossy, was born in 1918 at Essendon, Victoria, Australia. He died, unmarried in 1980 at Seaford, Victoria.

Bossy became well known in the Seaford area due to the number of people he saved from drowning in the Patterson Lakes. In one week, he saved the lives of five people as the newspaper article below explains.

from: Sydney Morning Herald, 10 January 1936

Jones Bossy newspaper

In 1936, Bossy received an honorary award for those lives saved from the Royal Humane Society.

Bossy went on to save the lives of 83 people and became known as ‘The Guardian of The River”

The following is a transcription of a newspaper article that was published after Bossy Jones’ death. It was given to me by a family member, but unfortunately there were no source details for it.

BOSSY JONES (the big man) who was fond of a beer is dead….
They’ll miss him in the pub at Carrum where he’d raise a laugh by pouring a glass over his head.
But the people of Carrum are determined that big Bossy will always be remembered – as a hero.
For Bossy was a one-man lifesaving club credited with saving 83 people from drowning in the Patterson River.
A plaque in his memory is to be set up on the foreshore at Carrum and the local council will create a garden.
Neighbors found bossy’s body when they went to his Attunga Cres, home where he lived alone, because they had not seen him for two days.
He was headed for a pauper’s grave until the news of his death got around and an appeal was opened to pay for his funeral.
“We raised enough for a decent funeral in one day, with enough left over to put up a plaque”, one of the organisers, John Hoyne said yesterday.
“The way things are going, if you made a bit of an effort you could build a lighthouse for him”, Mr. Hoyne said.
Carrum’s feelings for the big fellow were pretty well summed up in a poem, read at his funeral late last week and written by Mrs. Lillian Fisher, whose daughter Christine was one of those Bossy saved;

“A gentle man who spent his time in friendly company
God’s guardian of the river, that’s what he seemed to be,
He loved the open spaces, the sunshine and the sea,
And the laughter of the children as they frolicked merrily.
When danger threatened he was there, to save all 83,
The guardian of the river, that’s what he seemed to be.
Somehow it just won’t be the same, dear Bossy, now you’re gone,
But in our hearts you’ll always live, your memory lingers on”.

One of the many local people who Bossy taught to swim was Mrs. Peg Flanagan, who said yesterday that “all of Carrum thought the world of Bossy”.
“I went to school with bossy. He was awfully good at throwing pens into the ceiling and getting belted around the backside,, but he beat that by shoving books down his pants.
“All he wanted to do was get down by the river, lie on the sand and pull them out”, she said.
And pull them out he did in the days when the Patterson River was deep and treacherous.
Newspaper articles of the ’30’s record the young hero’s feats of pulling five people out of the river in a week when he was only 16, and diving from a bridge fully clothed to save a young girl.

For more information: https://sites.google.com/site/originalcarrumcowboys/r/bossy-jones-1

April A-Z Challenge – I is for Ann Izzard

The Blogging from A to Z April Challenge is a challenge put out to bloggers to publish a post from A-Z every day in April, except for Sundays. April 1 is A, and so on throughout the month. Bloggers can post randomly or on a theme. The theme I have chosen is ‘My Ancestors’. I used this same theme for the Blogging from A-Z April Challenge in 2015. This time the ancestors posted about will mostly be more distant members of the family. Hopefully, when combined this will form a full picture of my family history.

ANN IZZARD  was my great great grandmother on my maternal side of WATERS. Ann was born in 1806 at Guilden Morden, Cambridgeshire, England. Her parents were SAMUEL IZZARD and CHARLOTTE THURLEY.

Ann married my great great grandfather THOMAS WATERS, on 4 September 1824 at Dunton, Bedfordshire, England.  Thomas was a farmer, mainly growing vegetables,  after the purchase of a 173 acre  farm ‘Newtonbury’ at Dunton.

Thomas and Ann had nine children:

William born 1824
Edith born 1825
Elizabeth born 1828
Thomas born 1829
David born 1832
John born 1835
George born 1838
Mary born 1840
Annie born 1843

Anne Izzard died, age 46,  on 16 October 1851 at Dunton, Bedfordshire and was buried at Dunton cemetery, Bedfordshire.

 

April A-Z Challenge – H for Henry Lloyd Taylor

The Blogging from A to Z April Challenge is a challenge put out to bloggers to publish a post from A-Z every day in April, except for Sundays. April 1 is A, and so on throughout the month. Bloggers can post randomly or on a theme. The theme I have chosen is ‘My Ancestors’. I used this same theme for the Blogging from A-Z April Challenge in 2015. This time the ancestors posted about will mostly be more distant members of the family. Hopefully, when combined this will form a full picture of my family history.

H is for Henry Lloyd Taylor

Born in December 1953, at Whittlesea, Victoria, HENRY LLOYD TAYLOR was the 9th child of 12 children. As was the custom in this family, Henry was given the middle name of Lloyd, the maiden name of his mother MARTHA LLOYD. Each of his brothers also had the name of Lloyd. This custom appeared in most families until very recently. My father and his brothers had the middle name of Lloyd also.

Henry married Mary Ann Culver at the Wesleyan Church at Wangaratta, on 23 October, 1878. They had eight children – six boys and two girls, before Mary passed away in 1910.

On 8 January 1913, Henry married ELIZABETH ANN EDWARDS in Yarrawonga, Victoria. Elizabeth gave birth to a son, HENRY LLOYD in 1914

Henry Lloyd Taylor Snr, died on 20 November 1932 at Thornbury and is buried in the Heidelberg cemetery.

Henry Lloyd Taylor was the brother of my great  grandfather WILLIAM LLOYD TAYLOR.

Save

Save

#AtoZChallenge – G for Ann GALLAGHER

G is for ANN GALLAGHER,  who married my great great great grandfather DANIEL BOYLE, in about 1815, at Donegal Ireland.

Ann was born in about 1794 at Donegal. Her parents were JAMES GALLAGHER and ELLEN McCLUSKY.

Ann and Daniel had four children; two boys, Patrick and Donald and two girls Bridget and Ellen, who were born between 1820 and 1833.

On 26 February 1857, Ann, by then a widow, left Ireland for Australia on the ship ‘Pomona’, which began it’s journey at Liverpool. She travelled with her son Patrick and his family.

Ann lived her life at Violet Town, with her family around her until she passed away at age 87,  in 1881 at Violet Town. She is buried in the Violet Town cemetery.

VPRS 7666; Series Title: Inward Overseas Passenger Lists (British Ports) [Microfiche Copy of VPRS 947]
Death Certificate: Vic BDM9095

Save

Save

Save

Save

#AtoZChallenge – F for John Michael FOX

F is for JOHN MICHAEL FOX

JOHN MICHAEL FOX was born on 28 November 1888 at Gundagai NSW to parents GEORGE WILLIAM FOX and MARY ELIZABETH COONEY.

John Fox married my cousin 2x removed,  WINIFRED TAYLOR on 15 October 1913 at St.Kilda, Victoria. He died on 7 March 1933, at the age of 45, at Gundagai, and is buried in the North Gundagai Cemetery

from: The Gundagai Independent, 09 March 1933, page 2

Fox John Obituary

General regret was expressed throughout the town and district on Tuesday morning when it became known that Mr J.M. (Jack) FOX had passed suddenly away at his home about midnight on Monday. He was about town throughout the day, and chatted freely with his friends, returning home for the evening meal with his family. For the last few years he has been a victim to Sciatica, which exacted a heavy toll on his constitution, and in the last twelve months, had lost some weight, but nevertheless, was always cheerful.

In conversation with Mrs FOX, he complained that he was not feeling very well, and some time after the family had retired for the night, he was seized with a fit of coughing, and called to his wife, who went quickly to his aid, and ran post haste for the doctor; the daughter attending her father in the meantime. It was indeed a sad shock to the distracted wife on her arrival back home to find that her husband had succumbed to an attack of haemorrhage.

Deceased was the second youngest son of our respected old pioneer, Mr Geo. FOX and the late Mrs. FOX, and was 45 years of age. Well over 6ft. in height, “Jack” was a well known and popular figure around town, particularly among the sporting fraternity, being a keen follower of racing.

 He served his apprenticeship to the printing trade on the staff of the “Gundagai Times”, and with the exception of brief periods at Lockhart and Adelong, was employed with Mr Elworthy for nearly 30 years until the paper ceased publication about 15 months ago. 

Trustworthy and reliable, no better workman ever handled a “stick and rule”, and his quiet, even temperament made him popular with everybody. For many years he wrote turf notes for the “Times” and he was recognised authority on the form and breeding of horses.

It was at Lockhart he met his wife (Miss Taylor), whom he married over 28 years ago, and a family of ten children (many of them of tender years) are left to face the battle of life without the aid of their father.

Four brothers, (Messrs. George, Tom, Jim and Allan Fox) and four sisters (Mrs J.J. Fallon, Misses Lily, Nellie and Eileen FOX) also survived him, and the sympathy of the whole community goes out to the bereaved family and relatives in their sad trouble.

The funeral took place on Wednesday, deceased’s remains being laid to rest in the catholic portion of the north Gundagai cemetery, Rev Fr. Glover rendering the service at the graceside.

Fox John Headstone

Thanks to fellow researcher, Peter Toohey, for this information and photos.

Save

#AtoZChallenge – E for Elizabeth Macrow

E is for ELIZABETH MACROW who married my great grandfather ERNEST WATERS in Rochestor, Victoria, Australia, on 21st February 1899. Elizabeth was mostly known as Bessie.

A member of the Brunswick corps of The Salvation Army, Elizabeth decided to become a Salvation Army officer and entered officer training school at Melbourne on 28 June 1890.

MACROW-bessie

Elizabeth unfortunately contracted tuberculosis and quickly became very weak. At that time, Salvation Army officers were only allowed to marry other trained officers.  On 10 January 1899, Elizabeth resigned due to her ill health. This made it possible for her to marry my great grandfather, one month later. But her devotion to her religion continued until her death.

Elizabeth passed away, just two years after the marriage. She died at her parents home at Hawthorn, and is buried at Booroondara Cemetery, Melbourne.

Obituary, from the Salvation Army ‘War Cry”, 09 March 1901
A Faithful Warrior Gone to Rest
One who endured a fight of afflictions has entered into the joy of her Lord. Sister E. Waters (nee Bessie Macrow) was converted in the Army when hardly more than a child. She straightway settled in her soul that God would have her life’s best service, and as soon as she became old enough she applied for officership. When accepted, she began a career which was noted chiefly for its godliness and devotion. I met her at close of her service as an officer. She was suffering from tuberculosis of the lungs, and had been given a light appointment at the Victorian S.W.O. In spite of the opinion of the S.C.O. that she should rest, she pleaded to be allowed to work, and the thought of vacating her place in the fight was a source of real pain. At length, she was forced to relinquish duties, and sought a warmer climate. Now the announcement of her promotion to glory, causes me to stop and think. From all I knew of her, she was a sincere Christian, who would rather suffer the loss of anything than prove untrue to God or faithless in following His leading for her. There can be no regrets. The most trying feature of her illness was an intense weakness, but she has gone where there is no pain, but rest for the weary. She has gone, but her quiet, gentle influence will remain as a sweet and blessed memory to many.

 
 

 

Save